Kwan Yin

 

I made my first visit to the Far East in 1966. If there is such a thing as a past life, I discovered it there. There are several events that have stuck with me for the past 40 years plus to validate those happenings.

One of those uncanny situations revolved around statues in various forms throughout my travels. It wasn’t until years later when I moved to Hawaii, that I discovered the significance of Kwan Yin (Guan Yin, Quan Yin) in all her various poses.

I began this month of posting everyday with a short post on Mitzvah, stating that I am not of the Jewish faith, so I want to say I am not of the Buddhist faith, either. There are elements of both that I find valuable and incorporate into my own faith, however.

 

So it is in keeping with the blogging theme of this month that I return to Kwan Yin, the goddess of compassion, a bodhisattva who continues to teach me more about being a spiritual female.

I am a retired United Methodist minister who uses meditation in several forms. So I feel free to let Kwan Yin guide me in my inner evaluations.

When I need to hear it, she reminds me to be compassionate with myself as well as others.

She reassures me that unconditional love, what we preachers call “Grace”, is for all people, including myself.

She is a constant reminder that the blessings of human kindness, or Mitzvah, connect us all.

 

Most of all, she reveals the feminine face of God, and allows me to experience my faith in ways that are more meaningful in my life, ways that are real.

As I travel throughout the world, it is hard to forget that we are all One, all needing that touch of human kindness and compassion that Kwan Yin offers. What a wonderful way to look toward the new year of 2010!

 

A hui hou!

Addendum to Mokulele Road Trip

 

Aloha! I should have checked the map better before I posted on Saturday. See original post.

As we were flying out of Kahului over Haleakala, I took a shot of an island just below us. In my post, I questioned whether it was Lana`i or Moloka`i. It didn’t seem to be in the right place for either island. It wasn’t shaped like Lana`i, but didn’t seem to be quite right for Moloka`i.

After several emails back and forth with one of my readers, I realized it is Kaho`olawe, an island I rarely remember to think about. (Do you see me blushing?)

Of the eight primary volcanic islands that make up our state, it is the smallest. It has a fascinating history and I suggest you check it out more closely at this website, complete with pictures and the role played by the Kahoʻolawe Island Reserve Commission in preserving the Native Hawaiian culture.

Watch for next weekend’s post on another annual local event – Black & White Night in Hilo.

A hui hou!

Honokohau Harbor

 

Five years of my life were spent living on my 37’ O’Day sloop-rigged sailboat. It was something I’d dreamed of ever since I was a young girl. I remember reading many books about sailing and people living on boats, even though I’d never really been on a boat.

 

There are a few stories of my life of being a “liveaboard” on an old blog of mine. I sold that boat just a few years before I moved to Hawai`i, and I still miss it!

 

So when Judy Jones asked me to do a memorial service at sea for her husband, Bob, I jumped at the chance. Judy is a close friend, as well, and I assisted with the organization of a beautiful send-off out of the Honokohau Harbor here on the Kona side of the Big Island. Bob suffered a fatal heart attack while he was fishing on Christmas Island.

Here are a few pictures I took of that trip out into the Pacific Ocean when I wasn’t busy officiating. This first one shows some of the boats in the harbor as we pulled out.

 

This was the first time I’d seen Honokohau Harbor from the ocean side of the entrance. There is a mountain behind all that mist. We’d had small craft warnings all week. Then on the day of the service, it was calm and beautiful.

 

Here are a few more shots of the harbor from the ocean side. I probably should have put these into a collage, but I prefer looking at the bigger pictures of the ocean!

 

 

 

 

Friends joined us on their boats. When we were about five miles out, we had the ceremony and tossed leis into the water. The boats circled the leis several times, then headed back to the harbor. A beautiful Hawai`ian ritual! I wasn’t able to get a picture of that because I was in the process of officiating. I’ll need to leave that part to your imagination.

 

 

 

The skipper of the boat I was on had been Bob’s fishing partner on Christmas Island when Bob had his heart attack. He helped with the funeral the local Christmas Islanders held for Bob, and he placed Bob’s trusty fishing pole on top of the casket.

 

When we got back to shore, there was a huge potluck feast for everyone. It was a moving and yet joyous celebration of Bob’s life. He was well-loved by many.

A hui hou, Bob! You were well-loved by all!

 

To Our 44th President!


SURF AT BANYONS

click here for larger image
SURF AT BANYONS

There are many reasons why I am anxious to see Barack Obama inaugurated as our 44th President of the United States.

And there are two reasons that stand out strongly for me. One is that he was the Senator from Illinois, the state where I was born, raised, educated through high school. The other is that his background is the state of Hawai`i where I now live and work.

This man eats Spam musubi, as well as fresh ahi (tuna) sushi and sashimi. Not only is he a great speaker and orator, but he can talk and understand Hawai`ian Pidgin. He’s our man, one who knows how to body surf.

Now he will be the man for our country. May we all give him a chance to make changes that are greatly needed. May we all give him our full support, whether we always agree with him or not. It will take time to accomplish the miracles we expect of him.

Welcome, President Obama! Illegitimi non carborundum!