Earth and Ocean Fair

 

Last Saturday, on April 24, I was one of many who volunteered at the Earth and Ocean Fair at the Outrigger Keauhou Beach Resort and Kahalu`u Beach, a county park that adjoins the hotel. I even took part in the raffle fun, which consisted of getting your card stamped at specific displays. This card was then entered into a drawing! (I didn’t win anything.)

I was told that this fair began about ten years ago as Coral Awareness Day in an effort to let people know how to protect our fragile reef. It is still one of the primary features of this fair. Volunteers train to monitor the reef that is forming around the Big Island.

 

Information about the Big Island Reef Fund was available.

 

Everyone was there several hours early getting set up for their displays.

 

All the displays gave information on how to protect our natural surroundings here in Hawai`i, especially our giant sea turtles.

 

 

This display of debris found in our ocean is eye-opening.

 

A Mini Cooper and a sailboat were on display. I never did find out if they were being given away or just for show. Both are economical ways to travel.

 

 

This is just one of several displays of solar power businesses.

 

Someone walked around inside this humuhumunukunukuapua`a (our state fish), reminding people to protect our ocean life. I’ll bet you can’t say that name fast (unless you live here on the Big Island)!

 

I couldn’t resist getting a shot of the tide pools and beach area. What a beautiful and restful place to have a gathering of environmental folks.

 

Several culinary students from our West Hawaii campus, led by Chef Betty, prepared a variety of meals so we wouldn’t starve. They offered regular chili, vegetarian chili, chicken Caesar salad, and more.

 

One of the insects that plague us here is the fire ant.

 

Groups of young people who are committed to saving our earth and ocean put up several displays.

 

We take so much for granted. Here is a cost analysis of what our Natural Resource Management puts out to protect plants and animals, and control the weeds and invasive species of plants.

 

A colleague, Betsy Morrigan, volunteered at the “Fish for Knowledge” booth.

 

Much of the work done to protect and monitor the waters that surround our island state is funded through Hawai`i Sea Grant.

 

One area of the hotel was available for local crafts. I love the hand-woven baskets.

 

Several of the local “aunties” were demonstrating how to do the Lauhala weaving. I want one of their hats!

 

 

 

 

I accepted a cup of kava and started to sip it. One of the men standing by said to just knock it down in one gulp – so I did! I can’t say it’s delicious stuff, and it would take me a long time to deliberately include it in my diet.

 

Another Hawai`ian traditional food is poi, or pounded taro. This is another of those “delicacies” for which I haven’t acquired a taste yet. One of my students used to bring fried poi balls to class occasionally, however, and they were absolutely wonderful!

 

These taro roots are ready to be made into poi. In the background, this mother is feeding her child a bit of poi.

 

There were plenty of crafts for children. Betsy is holding a fish for them to add their colored thumbprint to the fish.

 

This is only a sampling of the many local crafts on display.

 

I was delighted (and proud) to see a former student, Ruth, representing the National Park Service.

 

Of course, no Hawai`ian festival is complete without a band and hula dancers.

 

 

 

 

 

It is nearly impossible to show you all the displays. I hope I was able to capture a feel for the day. You might Google this event because there were articles in the newspaper and other places. I love living in Hawai`i. Please do what you can to help preserve this Paradise!

 

A hui hou!

Big Island Resort – Waikoloa Hilton

While many of my friends and relatives are suffering under severe winter weather, I’m living here in sunshine and warm weather. I have had my share of cold, snowy and icy winters, so I’m not sorry to be living here now.

This past summer I attended a conference that was held at the Hilton Waikoloa here on the Big Island. I drove up from my home to attend. It was great fun to act like a tourist on my own island.

I spent several afternoons walking around the grounds and taking pictures. There were too many to put here individually, and the collages I’ve made don’t do it justice, so please look at this slide show before you read another word. http://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf

 

For a full-sized slideshow, click here

I first visited this hotel in 1995, fifteen years ago, and I’m still never tired of finding something new around a corner. I enjoy the dolphin area most of all. They are so playful. Check out the Dolphin Quest to find out more.

 

Most visitors are captured by the romance of riding to your room on a boat through the lagoons, even though they are man-made.

 

Along the edges of the boat ways you’ll find statues and birds of all sorts.

 

I have traveled extensively throughout Japan on many different occasions, so I loved finding the strong Japanese influence on the décor throughout the hotel and grounds.

 

Around the swimming pool you’ll find statues that represent the animals of the Chinese zodiac. I don’t think I got them all. Some were hidden from my line of sight.

 

Down the walkways of the hotel you’ll find works of art and more statues of Kwan Yin and other Bodhisattvas. I’ve done another post on Kwan Yin, but I didn’t show you all of the ones I photographed there.

 

A hui hou!

 

RMS Queen Mary 2

 

In March, 2006, Kailua-Kona had the privilege of having the RMS Queen Mary (QM2) sail into our harbor.

Fortunately, I happened to be in Kona that day getting my car serviced. I took the picture above from the back yard of the King Kamehameha Hotel in downtown Kona.

As I sat on the outside deck of the Kona Public Library sipping a coffee drink, I took this picture. It shows the difference between the QM2 and one of the regular cruise ships that visit us.

 

Later, as I waited to get the oil changed on my car, I took this photo from the dealership. There was a great deal of excitement in our little village of Kona that day.

 

When the RMS Queen Mary 2 was constructed, she was the “longest, widest and tallest passenger ship ever built.” Even though she no longer holds that distinction, she is a fantastic ship and I hope to take a cruise on her someday! For more you can read here and here.

A hui hou!

Christmas in Waikiki

 

We may not get snow, and Santa may be wearing his surfer shorts, but here in Hawaii, we do everything we can to create a holiday atmosphere. Tiny ukekeles adorn this holiday wreath.

A stroll through any of the hotel lobbies in Waikiki definitely needs to be on your agenda, if you want to experience the true Hawaiian Christmas spirit! Each hotel has its own unique way of decorating.

The Moana Surfrider Hotel, built in 1901, has an interesting history. Click on this link to read about it and thumb through pages with old pictures of Waikiki from its beginning. Their Christmas display in the lobby includes a snowy version of the hotel.

 

This shot of their Christmas tree gives you a glimpse of the interior.

 

Outside, lights swirl around the stately columns.

 

Across the street, you’ll find another charming display in the Princess Kaiulani Hotel lobby. What a delightful snowy village in Hawaii! This hotel was built on the estate of Hawaii’s last princess, Kaiulani.

 

 

I wrote about the Royal Hawaiian Hotel earlier this fall. The tree outside that hotel towers over shoppers and sightseeing visitors to our wonderful state.

 

MELE KALIKIMAKA
(Merry Christmas in Hawaiian)

Addendum to Mokulele Road Trip

 

Aloha! I should have checked the map better before I posted on Saturday. See original post.

As we were flying out of Kahului over Haleakala, I took a shot of an island just below us. In my post, I questioned whether it was Lana`i or Moloka`i. It didn’t seem to be in the right place for either island. It wasn’t shaped like Lana`i, but didn’t seem to be quite right for Moloka`i.

After several emails back and forth with one of my readers, I realized it is Kaho`olawe, an island I rarely remember to think about. (Do you see me blushing?)

Of the eight primary volcanic islands that make up our state, it is the smallest. It has a fascinating history and I suggest you check it out more closely at this website, complete with pictures and the role played by the Kahoʻolawe Island Reserve Commission in preserving the Native Hawaiian culture.

Watch for next weekend’s post on another annual local event – Black & White Night in Hilo.

A hui hou!

Honokohau Harbor

 

Five years of my life were spent living on my 37’ O’Day sloop-rigged sailboat. It was something I’d dreamed of ever since I was a young girl. I remember reading many books about sailing and people living on boats, even though I’d never really been on a boat.

 

There are a few stories of my life of being a “liveaboard” on an old blog of mine. I sold that boat just a few years before I moved to Hawai`i, and I still miss it!

 

So when Judy Jones asked me to do a memorial service at sea for her husband, Bob, I jumped at the chance. Judy is a close friend, as well, and I assisted with the organization of a beautiful send-off out of the Honokohau Harbor here on the Kona side of the Big Island. Bob suffered a fatal heart attack while he was fishing on Christmas Island.

Here are a few pictures I took of that trip out into the Pacific Ocean when I wasn’t busy officiating. This first one shows some of the boats in the harbor as we pulled out.

 

This was the first time I’d seen Honokohau Harbor from the ocean side of the entrance. There is a mountain behind all that mist. We’d had small craft warnings all week. Then on the day of the service, it was calm and beautiful.

 

Here are a few more shots of the harbor from the ocean side. I probably should have put these into a collage, but I prefer looking at the bigger pictures of the ocean!

 

 

 

 

Friends joined us on their boats. When we were about five miles out, we had the ceremony and tossed leis into the water. The boats circled the leis several times, then headed back to the harbor. A beautiful Hawai`ian ritual! I wasn’t able to get a picture of that because I was in the process of officiating. I’ll need to leave that part to your imagination.

 

 

 

The skipper of the boat I was on had been Bob’s fishing partner on Christmas Island when Bob had his heart attack. He helped with the funeral the local Christmas Islanders held for Bob, and he placed Bob’s trusty fishing pole on top of the casket.

 

When we got back to shore, there was a huge potluck feast for everyone. It was a moving and yet joyous celebration of Bob’s life. He was well-loved by many.

A hui hou, Bob! You were well-loved by all!

 

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