More About the E-course

“Growing Older with Gusto!” is now available for registration!

If you are interested, go to https://lavalily.com/learn-with-lucy to find out more about the course and to register. Checking out with PayPal will give you access to the course on February 5, 2023.

Because I am teaching this course through WordPress.com, you will also need to sign up for an account with WordPress.com. It’s simple and it’s free!

In the meantime, go to the link above, and read more about the course. I will be offering several other courses in the future. Share this information with anyone you think might be interested. If you have any questions, send me a note via lucyj@lavalily.com.

A hui hou

Lucy

Growing Older with Gusto!

https://lavalily.com/learn-with-lucy

The e-course is available for registration! I realize there may be a problem with the registration page, but if you are interested, you can go ahead and send your name, phone number, and email address to me: lucy@lucyleejones.com. Checking out with PayPal will give you access to the course on February 5, 2023.

In the meantime, go to the link above, and read more about the course. I will be offering several other courses over the next few months. Share this information with anyone you think might be interested.

A hui hou

Lucy

ARUGULA!

Growing space is limited for me, even though I have a couple of raised beds. They are at a level that keeps me from having to bend too far or get down on my knees (difficult if not impossible these days)!

I need several more to really grow as much food as I’d like. So as much as I love fresh lettuce, I have settled for buying it at the market and using my garden space for things I can’t easily find to buy – like arugula and certain herbs.

I enjoy growing arugula (sometimes called “rocket”), and I love the spicy flavor. Before I started growing my own arugula, I bought what I needed at a little outdoor market and coffee shop in downtown Tucson. One of the growers there always had a huge batch of arugula for sale. I no longer live in Tucson, so I miss that little market and the friends who gathered thee.

My current patch of arugula is in a raised bed right by my side patio. Arugula grows quickly, and I love to pick a handful to add to my salad or sandwich. The more I pick, the thicker it grows! Fresh arugula is such a delicious treat!

A hui hou!

Ginger-Limeade

If you are looking for a delicious, refreshing, non-alcoholic drink to enjoy, here it is!

Anyone who knows me well knows that I love to drink Ginger Beer. It’s non-alcoholic, sharp, and refreshing. Similar to that is my very favorite drink (similar to Ginger Beer) is Ginger Limeade.

You can buy this drink in a bottle in many of our Hawaiian stores. It is made locally, and it’s very similar to Ginger Beer, but it will never surpass the taste of freshly made in your own kitchen.

I can only give you the approximate proportions I use, and you may need to experiment for your own tastes. If you wish, lemons could probably be substituted for limes, but I have never tried it. I have limes, and I prefer limes, so that’s what I use.

The piece of ginger I use is about 3/4 the size of the one in the picture above. Peel it, then slice it into thin circles.

Put these in a saucepan, add about 1 cup of sugar, more or less to taste (I use Splenda or Monkfruit or Erythritol for this). Fill to about an inch from the top with water. Simmer until it has reduced by about half.

Let it cool while you squeeze the juice from about 8-10 limes. Add the juice to the ginger syrup. I add either a liter of seltzer water or diet tonic (my preference).

Serve over ice for one of the most delightful drinks you’ll find anywhere. There is almost always a pitcher of it waiting in my fridge!

A hui hou!

Clara’s Dilly Bread

Herb Garden

This is a wonderfully fragrant and delicious bread that originated with my mother years ago. “Clara” was a woman in a church where my father was pastor, and she had given this recipe to my mother. This is something I look forward to making now that I have an oven again.

I have added Mother’s comments, some of them seem a bit old-fashioned. Plus she always wrote her recipes out on onion-skin paper, making it extremely difficult to read! I think you can enlarge the picture of the recipe to get an idea of what I had to translate.

This was a staple in my home when I was growing up and she sent this to me when I was a young bride. I had to laugh when I read her last comment about how to eat the loaf! I’d forgotten that.

Recipe on Onion Skin

Mix 1 package dry yeast with ¼ cup warm water.

Add 1 cup creamed cottage cheese OR 1 cup clabbered milk heated to lukewarm, 2 tablespoons sugar and 1 tablespoon minced fresh onion.

Mix in 1 tablespoon butter, 2 teaspoons dill seed, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 unbeaten egg, ¼ teaspoon soda, and 4-5 cups flour (more or less to make the right consistency of bread dough.)

Combine all in a mixing bowl, let rise until double in bulk in warm place (50-60 minutes).

Punch down and put into 2 greased loaf pans, or 1 loaf pan and 1 greased round casserole.

Let rise a bit, then bake in 350 degree oven for 50-60 minutes until done.

Remove from oven and butter tops thoroughly while hot and sprinkle with lots of salt.

This is a lovely bread to give as a gift, or to slice for a party.

The final note on my mother’s recipe: “If the family isn’t around, eat one loaf yourself and save the other until they get home.”  There was never any left over for sandwiches to take to school.

A hui hou!

Middle East Journey

This week is an appropriate time to share a little bit about one of my trips to the Middle East. I was still in active ministry at the time, making everything I learned there more valuable.

So much of what we saw on that trip was exactly how most people picture that part of the world – wide expanses of desert with Bedouins and their tents. Expand the picture above and you’ll get a better idea of a typical Bedouin with his camel.

When I was offered a chance to ride a camel, I quickly agreed. Riding a camel certainly has been one of my more unique experiences! I’d been riding horses for many years, so I thought a camel would be a cinch. How wrong I was!

Camels have a nasty disposition! Also, along with their constant complaining, they bend down in stages to let you climb on, which gives you the sensation of being on a very fluky rocking chair (or a slow roller coaster).

LUCY ON A CAMEL

I took this ride near the Qumran where ancient papyrus scrolls were found in 1945. Later, I visited the museum where these scrolls are on exhibit.

QUMRAN

In just a few days, we will celebrate Epiphany and the magi who followed a star to visit a baby in a stable. The word Epiphany means a “revelation,” or what I call an “ah ha!” moment and especially when we realize that God or the Holy Spirit is with us at all times, no matter what our religious tradition.

In the meantime, I want to say that I truly appreciate those guys even more now. I can empathize with the grueling ride they must have had on those camels!

Hau`oli Makahiki Hou! (Happy New Year)

The Black Madonna

Our Lady of Guadalupe

I have been collecting representations of the Black Madonna for many years. I’m not quite sure what my attraction is, but I suspect it’s because she’s not the untouched virginal White Madonna we often think of at this time of year. The Black Madonna has been through the fires of experience and has survived, each time stronger than ever. I have photographs of paintings, sculptures, icons, and more.

The Black Madonna is a national symbol in Poland, with Polish Catholics making the pilgrimage as often as possible to see her. The story of how she came to be known as the Black Madonna can be found here. You might want to search for a list of countries where the various Black Madonnas can be found.

There is a beautiful essay online by Rev. Dr. Matthew Fox first written in 2006. I highly recommend that article to you. He talks about the “Return of the Black Madonna” as being a sign of our times.

Of all the female religious icons, the Black Madonna is my favorite, and my favorite representation is the Virgen de Guadalupe (Spanish for the “Virgin of Guadalupe”). Most of my collection is about her. I even have a mouse pad with her picture on it, although someone once asked if I didn’t think it was a bit sacrilegious to be running a mouse over her.

I love to light rose-scented candles labeled “Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe” that are very popular with the Mexican population. When I lived in Tucson, I kept one burning on the altar in my entryway at all times. What a warm welcome the smell of roses gave each time I walked in my door.

The photo above is a painting that hangs by my front door of Our Lady of Guadalupe. I also have a huge platter with her image painted on it, that even my Kaimana Kat seemed to love!

There are several books available if you are interested in reading more about the Black Madonna. Three exceptionally good books of all the ones I own are:

1) Longing for Darkness: Tara and the Black Madonna, by China Galland
2) Our Lady of Guadalupe: Faith and Empowerment among Mexican-American Women by Jeanette Rodriquez
3) Dancing in the Flames by Marion Woodman and Elinor Dickson.

I highly recommend any of these for enlightened reading this time of year.  You may never think of the Madonna in the same way again.

Mele Kalikimaka and  a hui hou!

Growing Older with Gusto!

“Growing Older with Gusto!” is on the way! I’ll have the sign-up page ready in the next few days, so watch for it.

This e-course will be for younger women and men who are beginning to realize their mortality. They are getting a few (or more) gray hairs, they are seeing a few wrinkles in the face, and they don’t like it. Most of all, they fear what is to come. None of us knew what to expect because we had never been “old” before!

When you get the information, please consider forwarding it to any younger person you know. Encourage them to take part. Over the course of six weeks, I will cover all their questions, and maybe even answer a few questions they didn’t know they had.

Nothing will stop us from the normal path of life where we finally grow older. Life is terminal, but it doesn’t have to be a dreaded part of life. It’s too easy to say, “It’s all in your attitude!” There are actual things we can do to live every minute of the life we have, and allow those minutes to be enjoyable. We can live every day with Gusto!

A hui hou!

Jalapeño/Artichoke Dip

Without a doubt, this is probably my favorite dip to share but it’s not for the weak of heart (or delicate tastebuds)!

I happen to love spicy hot flavors in much of my food. I have lived in the Southwest US off and on for many years. I moved to Hawaii from Tucson about 27 years ago, and I brought my need for spice with me.

Once the ingredients are on hand, it’s only a matter of a few minutes to have it ready to put into your best terra cotta dish. If you have a food processor you can use that; otherwise a blender would work. Surround your dish with chunks of sourdough bread, chunky crackers, torn pita, chips, or a few veggies, and it’s ready to serve.

Chop up about a cup of marinated artichoke hearts. Add a 4-0unce package of softened plain cream cheese, ¼ cup mayo, ½ cup freshly grated parmesan and pulse in bursts to help mix everything together. If it’s too thick, sprinkle in a little water until the dip is just the way you want it.

When this is mixed to suit you, stir in a couple tablespoons of chopped fresh or pickled jalapeños. This is where you need to be mindful of your heat tolerance, especially if it’s for a potluck or a party, so add the jalapeños mindfully. You can add salt to taste, but I tend not to add much salt, if at all, because I think the flavors are enough in themselves.

Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

A hui hou!

You’ve Been Waiting for This

My Sunday blog posts are generally about food, gardening, writing, travel, and all sorts of various topics. I’m not much of a “niche” person, because my personality is more profoundly diverse. This mid-week blog will attempt a different path and focus on what I learned in interviewing more than one hundred women over sixty when I was on Sabbatical about 3 years ago. I call these women my “Perennials.”

Many of you have been waiting for the e-course I’ve been putting together about being or becoming a Perennial. “GrowingOlder with Gusto!” is just about ready to launch, so keep your eye on this spot each Wednesday.

This e-course will be for women and men of all ages who do not look forward to getting older. In this e-course, they will learn what it takes to be a Perennial, and how to look forward to growing older rather than dreading it. As a friend said, “We don’t HAVE to grow older. We GET to grow older.” Not everyone gets that opportunity.

Adding years to our life is nothing to be afraid of, after all. As I’ve read in so many places, “we start aging the minute we are born.” It’s only when we reach our thirties and forties that we start to notice the process that’s been happening since birth.

One thing I discovered about the “Perennials” I’ve interviewed is that we are an inquisitive bunch. We are not always satisfied with accepting things the way they are, but we are always looking for what makes something “tick.”

In other words, our curiosity pushes us to explore, to keep our minds active, to push our own limits, and to become “Perennials” who are forever blooming.  Does that sound like you, too?

“Growing Older with Gusto!” will be appropriate for people of all ages. I welcome and encourage your contribution to the course discussion

Does this sound like a course you’d like to share with the younger people in your life? Would you also like to learn more about “Growing Older with Gusto?”

Watch for more information next Wednesday! I look forward to your comments on this post.

A hui hou!