Wind Farm Cemetery

Recently, I have made several trips to the end of South Point Road to show visitors the Southernmost point in the United States. These remnants of a wind farm make me wonder just how environmentally conscious it is to let these stand. New working turbines have been built to take the place of the old ones, but what will we do with these discarded and useless turbines?

Read more here.

A hui hou!

Back to School

My posts have been primarily about gardening with some cooking, some travel, and some reflection pieces. These topics illustrate my “spare time” hobbies rather than my “day job.”

This week, I’ve decided to share with you the way I walk (run?) through my world when I’m not gardening, cooking, traveling, or reflecting. Here is my fall schedule and a little blurb on what each class is about.

FamR 230 – Human Development – During the semester, we move through life from conception to death. Each age group is studied from the three perspectives of physical development, cognitive development, and psychosocial development.

PSY 100 – Survey of Psychology – I probably don’t need to explain this one, do I? We study the biological aspect of psychology, why we act the way we, how we interact with others, what the various theories are in the field of human behavior.

SUBS 140 – Individual Counseling – We look at the various theories in more depth than what we briefly covered in PSY 100. Students are given an opportunity to explore their own abilities to counsel another person.

SUBS 268 – Survey of Substance Abuse Problems – This is an introductory course that explores all addictions, behavioral as well as chemical. This is for anyone who wants more information in this area, especially those going into any medical field, teachers, counselors.

SUBS 280 – Co-occurring Disorders – This is a more advanced course for those planning to be substance abuse counselors. We tackle the complex situation where a person has both a mental disorder and a substance abuse disorder.


Loitering in the courtyard

If you think you want to take courses at the college, it’s too late to apply for fall semester at this time. You might want to consider talking to someone in the Student Services offices, however, and start the process for Spring 2012.


Yes, we eat a lot, too!

For those of you here on the Big Island, Hawai`i Community College has campuses on both sides of the island. Most are face to face in a classroom, but there are plenty of online courses available, as well. If you live on other islands, in other states or nations, check for campuses near you. I have students from late teens into their sixties, some going into another career after retirement. It’s never too late to go back to school.

Education is so….educational!
A hui hou!

Fire Dancer on Waikiki

Another attraction here is the Hawaiian Fire Dancer. I’ve known young children who were already training, showing great skill. Check out this past Monday’s post to see the Fourth of July fireworks. The fire dance performance took place at the Luau that marked the end of the conference I attended on Waikiki.

At one point in this YouTube, the dancer leaves the stage, but he went to get more fire. Don’t think it’s finished when that happens. He comes back!

I give my brother, Hilton, credit for the silhouette on Waikiki Beach at the beginning of this post.

A hui hou!

Fireworks on Waikiki!

One week ago we celebrated Fourth of July as a nation. I was attending a conference on Oahu, staying in a hotel on Waikiki. I had a ring-side seat to the fantastic fireworks display.

Waiting for the big event, I watched the sun drop down behind the horizon, something we all seem to love – and there’s nothing quite like a sunset on Waikiki.

I was able to get a short video on my little Nikon CoolPix camera. It may be a little blurry or shaky, but in case you missed the fireworks somewhere else, you can watch this YouTube. Pretend you are sitting with me on the balcony of my hotel on beautiful Waikiki Beach!

A hui hou!

“Wine and Words”

If you haven’t checked out Kona Stories, give yourself a treat and stop by. There is much more than books to be found as you cruise through, and comfy chairs where you can relax.

Kona Stories was begun five years ago by Brenda Eng and Joy Vogelgesang. They recently moved from Mango Court to the Keauhou Shopping Center. Be sure to check out their web site for the many events going on there.

For me, one of the highlights offered by the shop is the monthly “Wine and Words.” This happens at 6:00 pm the first Tuesday of each month, when various local authors are invited to read excerpts from a book they have written. As you wait to listen, you can visit with friends, browse the shelves and enjoy a glass of wine (or water) along with a few pupus.

Last week I attended with several friends to listen to Nancee Cline, who teaches English at our West Campus of Hawaii Community College. There was standing room only as Nancee read from her book, Queen Emma’s Church in Kealakekua: Crossroads of Culture. She began by saying it was so much more than simply a history of the church. Her book is rich with anecdotes, interviews, and more.

After the reading, people lined up to visit with Nancee and buy an autographed copy.

I didn’t get a chance to cruise through the shop as much as I would like because it was way too crowded. That won’t be the last time I stop by, however. I want to return for a visit with the store’s mascot!

Congratulations, Nancee! We’re proud of your accomplishments.

A hui hou!

Hawai`i Community College is 70 Years Old!

It’s that time of year when I get to show off my students and colleagues as we gathered for the 2011 graduation. This time Hawai`i Community College celebrated 70 years of existence! It’s impossible to describe everything that went on.

This particular graduation ceremony was for the West Campus of Hawai`i Community College where I teach.

This past Wednesday’s post showed how the kihei was made. Part of the celebration included everyone wearing their personal kihei. The students were presented a kihei as a gift and the faculty was given the honor of tying the kihei on our students.

If I’d taken a video of it all, you would have heard the chanting, the blowing of the (conch shell), or watched the dancing and blessings, or the tossing of hats at the end, or tasted the cake at the reception.

Since I can’t share everything about that experience with you, you can still watch this slide show and imagine yourself in the middle of all the excitement. Most are pictures of everyone making sure the academic hoods and kihei are hanging the right way with lots of moving around. The posed pictures are a few of my students and faculty friends.

Congratulations to all the graduates and those who received special awards. As part of the faculty, I can say I am truly proud of each one!

A hui hou!