Whole Wheat Quinoa Waffles

This past week, a friend called to ask if I had a good recipe for waffles, and she didn’t want to use a MIX. We began to reminisce about waffles from our childhood. I gave her a recipe I found in a very old Betty Crocker cookbook while she looked up “waffles” online.

I’m not sure what she eventually ended up doing, but I think it was a combination of several recipes. After our conversation, I started getting hungry for waffles, too.

I have a new cookbook Quinoa 365: The Everyday Superfood
that includes a recipe for Quinoa Waffles. This recipe is an adaptation of the recipe from that book. I try to find as many ways to use versatile quinoa that I can.

Ingredients
1 ¼ cups quinoa flour (uncooked quinoa ground in the blender)
1 cup whole wheat flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 ½ tablespoons sugar (or Splenda)
¼ teaspoon salt

2 beaten eggs
1 ¼ cup Blue Diamond Almond Breeze (or lowfat milk, if you prefer)
1 cup water
½ cup canola oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions
Combine quinoa flour, whole wheat flour, baking powder, sugar and salt in a large bowl.

In a separate bowl, combine the beaten eggs, almond milk, water, oil and vanilla. Mix well.

Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture. Using a small hand mixer, blend well until it is a thin batter.

Preheat waffle iron, spraying it with your choice of oil spray. Use the directions that came with your waffle iron.

I ate one serving with a scoop of no-sugar-added vanilla ice cream and topped it with sugar-free caramel syrup. The rest I put into small sandwich bags to freeze until the waffle mood strikes again.

My Notes: The first waffles out were not crispy and almost too soft. My waffle iron is automatic and clicks when something is done, so I left the next batches in a little longer. That didn’t quite do the trick, but they were still delicious! The next time, I might add a bit more whole wheat flour for a thicker batter. This may take more experimenting, but I don’t mind being the guinea pig for these.

A hui hou!

Pink Grapefruit Marmalade Glazed Pork

I wrote about my homemade pink grapefruit marmalade in July last year. Since then I have eaten it on ice cream, bagels, scones, toast and sometimes just by the spoonful.

A friend brought over a large piece of cooked, leftover pork tenderloin on a recent visit. We came up with the idea of using our marmalade as a glaze for the pork. Do I need to tell you it was delicious?

In a pan, combine the following:

1/3 cup Kikkoman Lite soy sauce
1/3 cup pink grapefruit marmalade
1/3 cup honey
1 tablespoon (plus to taste) rice wine vinegar
A pinch of dried, crushed hot Thai peppers from my garden

Let this simmer for a few minutes until well combined and the honey has melted. Pour the hot glaze over thick slices of pork. Because the pork was already cooked, I baked it in a moderate oven until the pork was heated through and nicely glazed.

I think this would be great over chicken or beef as well. Enjoy!

A hui hou!

Dried Cherry Crumb Pie

2-20-11 Dried Cherry Crumb Pie

When I picked up a huge bag of dried cherries at Costco a few weeks ago, I had no clue what I was going to do with them. I love fresh cherry pie, but we aren’t getting fresh cherries in right now, so I wondered if I could make a decent pie out of dried cherries.

After checking on the internet, I came up with the following recipe to try. I have to say that the flavor was even more intense than fresh cherries, if that’s possible.

I forgot to take a picture before I started putting the crumb topping on the filling, but in this photo, you can see how beautifully glazed the filling looked. I also apologize for letting the entire pie get eaten without taking a picture of a piece. I’ll do it next time, I promise!

Put 3 cups of dried cherries in a large sauce pan and cover with 3 cups of boiling water. Let this soak for about 30 minutes while you make your pie shell. I suggest you use my tried and true, super simple pie crust that you can find here.

By the time you get that finished, your 30 minutes should almost be up. Put the soaked cherries and liquid over medium heat, add ½ cup flour and 1 cup sugar, stirring and simmering until thick. Remove from heat and add 1 teaspoon almond extract.

Cover with crumb topping. Put ½ stick butter, ½ cup packed brown sugar, and ½ cup flour in food processor (or mix together until crumbly). Spoon this over the cherries and bake at 400 degrees for about 35 minutes.

It was out of this world delicious! I’m going to try it with other dried fruits.

A hui hou!

LILIKOI CRÈME BRULÉ

Bag of Lilikoi
Bag of Lilikoi

Anything to do with lilikoi has been one of the mostly highly popular topics of this blog. One reader (Kaleo) just sent this recipe for me to try. I’m not able to eat anything like it right now, so I’m passing it on for someone else to try it and let us know how it is. It sounds perfect for those of you who froze your lilikoi juice.

LILIKOI CRÈME BRULÉ

Ingredients

2 cups heavy cream
3 ounces egg yolk, about 4 large egg yolks
¼ cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla
Some baker’s or bar sugar, the superfine stuff.
3 ice cubes of lilikoi juice

Directions

Preheat Oven to 300º F. Use a thermometer to be accurate.
Whisk cream, sugar, egg yolks, lilikoi juice, and vanilla until smooth. Strain through tea strainer to remove egg crud.

Heat mixture to 165° F in saucepan. Transfer to baking bowls. Bake at 300° for exactly 20 minutes. Cool. (Kaleo says the secret is preheating the custard in a sauce pan to exactly 160-165 degrees.)

Sprinkle an even layer of baker’s sugar on top of chilled crème brulé after cooling and caramelize by using a chef’s blowtorch (or a pencil blowtorch available at Radio Shack for about 1/4 the price). Act quickly to ensure that the crème remains chilled and the top is crisp and brown.

Eat at once as this does not keep because the sugar crust will dissolve over time. It is okay to not put the crust on and keep a day or so, then put the crust on when you’re ready to serve.

All I can say is that this sounds absolutely heavenly!

Mahalo plenty, Kaleo!

A hui hou!

This Week of Lights

Hanukkah, or Chanukah, meaning “dedication,” is an eight-day Festival of Lights celebrated by the Jewish faith. This year, it began at sunset on December 1.

The second temple in Jerusalem was rededicated after a successful uprising of the Jews against the Syrian government. Their leader, Judah Maccabee, lit the branched menorah, which was to burn every night.

According to legend, there was only enough olive oil to keep this candelabrum burning for one night, but it continued for eight nights. This gave them time to locate more oil to keep it burning after that time. This is an exceptionally abbreviated history of this celebration, but you can read more details of the history behind Hanukkah here.

Traditionally, latkes or potato pancakes are eaten during this period of time. You may wonder what the connection is between potato pancakes and Hanukkah. The latkes are fried in generous amounts of oil to symbolize the oil that kept the menorah burning for eight nights, although I imagine in today’s time, many look for lower fat ways to make their latkes. Just recently, I saw a recipe for sweet potato latkes that looked delicious and healthy!

The basic recipe for latkes is grated potato and onion mixed with a beaten egg, a couple tablespoons of matzo meal or flour, salt and pepper to taste, and made into small pancakes. These are smashed flat and fried in a skillet in several tablespoons of olive oil, turning to brown on both sides. I remember eating these topped with applesauce. I have read that the starchier the potato, the crispier the latke. If you search Google for latkes, you’ll find all sorts of variations.

Oh my, I’m getting hungry for latkes!

Shalom!

Oktoberfest in Hawai`i

When I was in high school, my father was the first English speaking pastor of a church that had once been considered a “German church.” Everyone spoke German, I learned Christmas carols in German, and the food was always German. No wonder I had trouble in gaining weight!

Every Thursday, the women met to quilt and served sauerkraut, spare ribs, and mashed potatoes. They always saved a plateful for me to eat as soon as I got back from school. Then I would sit down and quilt with them, trying to imitate their tiny stitches.

On October 1 of this year, I had the pleasure of attending an Oktoberfest at St. Jude’s Episcopal Church here on the Big Island. Instead of spare ribs, we were served a long Bratwurst; instead of mashed potatoes, we received a big boiled potato, but we did receive a big helping of sauerkraut and a bottle of non-alcoholic beer (St. Pauli N.A.). Apple strudel finished off the meal.

There was a wonderful 7-piece polka band, complete with several accordions, a string bass, trombone, clarinet, piano and drum.

The Fraulein servers were authentic. . . .

. . . and the dancing was exuberant.

You never forget how to dance a polka! But when I asked a friend to dance with me, she said she didn’t know how. I easily taught her, however, and we took off in a whirl.

We were taught several German songs. One was “Hock Soll er Leben,” or “Hail to the Host,” which we sang several times during the evening, each time raising our beer bottles to the host.

This Musik Meister led us in song, and also played one of the accordions.

Another tongue-twister song was “Oh Du Schöne Schnitzelbank,” a song we were told was never sung in Germany, but was local only in America.

I brought home a plate of leftovers from the church kitchen and relished the meal again later.

A hui hou!

Gazpacho with Crumbled Feta Cheese

I learned about Gazpacho when I first moved to California in 1960. It was a huge fad at that time, and I was knocked over by it! It’s been called everything, including “liquid salad,” but whatever you call it, it’s simply delicious!

This may seem like a summer-only dish to many of the mainlanders, but in California, and especially here in Hawai`i, we can eat it year-round.

The beauty of a healthy serving of Gazpacho is that you can put almost any kind of raw veggie into it. Take your pick from:

fresh tomatoes (about 2-3 pounds cut into quarters, skin and all)
cucumber
carrots
onion
bell peppers (I used a combination of orange, red, yellow baby bells)
garlic
hot pepper (maybe a Jalepeño)

Zap it up in a blender or food processor until thick and chunky.

Store it in the fridge until it’s good and cold.

Ladle it into a bowl, top with crumbled feta and sprigs of cilantro.

To go with this, I like to serve a good loaf of crunchy rustic bread fresh from the oven, and maybe a big hunk of sharp cheese.

Dig in!