White Rain Lily

I planted a few tiny bulbs about five years ago and I always forget they are there. After several nice rains, one little beauty popped its head through for me this morning. It is known for blooming only after rain, and still it is always a surprise when it does bloom. The rest of the year, I don’t even know they are there. Tiny and delicate, the leaves are like narrow blades of grass, and the bloom itself is small. The wind was blowing the blossom a bit, so one is slightly blurry. I thought you might enjoy sharing the surprise with me.

A hui hou!
Lucy

Mele Kalikimaka!

We may not have a White Christmas in Hawaii
(except on top of Mauna Kea)
but we do have an incredible display of poinsettias!

All along the highway we find massive blooms,
some in long banks of poinsettia hedges –
others peeking out from behind trees.

As late as April,
I have seen a wayward bloom
here and there that
simply didn’t want to go away.

Wherever you are in this world,
I send you joy in this wonderful holiday season.

A hou hou!
and
Mele Kalikimaka!

A Garden Surprise

My garden has suffered from too much neglect this fall. A friend in Hilo gifted me some “old” unwanted plants. One was a pot of orchids that seriously needed to be divided. I’ve been trying to remember to nurture them along until I could do something with them. I have managed to sprinkle them with a little water from time to time, so they have survived (barely).

One morning as I was leaving for school, this is what I saw. Not only that, but there are four more spikes about ready to open up anytime. What a delightful surprise!

I have no idea what variety they are, so if someone knows, please let me know. Now that I have seen how beautiful they are, and as soon as they have finished their blooming, I’ll divide them and get them into my “orchid patch” under the ohia tree.

A hui hou!

Hawai`ian Flowers, Part 2

Last weeks’s post showed the color and drama orchids can bring to your trees. This week, I give you a tour of the inner workings of Hawaiian Flowers.

Marla has a small gift shop attached to the greenhouses where you can browse.

Walking from the gift shop into the greenhouses, you instantly realize you are in the tropics, and you want to take home one of each variety!

Many years ago, I took all the horticulture courses offered by Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. The smells and sights of greenhouses and workrooms bring back memories of that time. So for me, those are still the most exciting areas of any commercial enterprise.

The results from TLC and perfect growing conditions, however, also bring a particular kind of joy, as you will see in this slide show of Marla’s orchids in full bloom.

A hui hou!

Hawai`ian Flowers

In the part of the world where I grew up, an orchid meant you had a special date to the high school prom. And it was a big deal!

Now I live where orchids are grown everywhere and can become as rampant as weeds, yet I still am in awe at the abundance of plants and where they can grow. Maybe you are, too.

Just a couple miles from my home is Hawaiian Flowers, an incredible orchid farm that grew from a small hobby into a large facility. She claims it is the “Southernmost Orchid Farm in the US.” You can find her on Facebook as Hawaiian.Flowers. (Be sure to put the period between Hawaiian and Flowers!)

When our garden club went to visit, we walked through the acreage surrounding Marla’s home as well as through the greenhouses where she grows some of the most beautiful orchids you will ever see.

This slide show demonstrates how lush an orchid can grow in your trees. You might want to try this if you live in an area where there is no frost any time of the year. I bought a few from her and will try to recreate the same sort of garden.

Next week I’ll show more of the flowers, but this week I wanted to show you just how easy it is to grow orchids wherever the climate permits.
A hui hou!

IT’S SPRING!!

HAPPY FIRST DAY OF SPRING!

Even if the ground is frozen where you live, you know that Spring is right around the corner. Have you been going through your seed catalogs? Have you started getting itchy fingers, wanting to dig in the dirt? Are you monitoring the slightest change in temperature?

If so, you have the same case of Spring Fever that I do. I’m on Spring Break this next week and I’ll have more time to weed my beds, plant seeds, and nurture what’s already growing.

A hui hou!

White Rain Lily

I planted several of these tiny bulbs (Zephyranthes candida) on April 14, 2009. The first year, about 3 little strands that looked like grass came up, then nothing at all. I thought they had completely died. Today I happened to look down along the redwood path by my house and there it was.

I purchased these and other bulbs from Old House Gardens. According to the blurb that came with them, this plant was discovered in Argentina in the 1500s. These particular ones date to 1826.

“Its grassy foliage is followed in early fall by short, white crocus-like flowers that open after every rain.”

A day later, it had opened up even more.

So after the wonderful rains this past week, the only rains of any significance since I first planted the bulbs, here it is. What a sweet and beautiful way to end the old year!

Hau`oli Makahiki Hou! (Happy New Year!)