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A New Book!

Whether or not you have followed my blog over its lifespan of fifteen years, you might enjoy browsing through the recipes in this little cookbook. It contains all of the recipes I’ve posted over the years, including my world-famous no-roll pie crust that melts in your mouth.

Please check out my Amazon Author Page to find this and other books I’ve written.

Also, please check out https://lavalily.com/learn-with-lucy/ for the latest e-course being offered, based on my Feral Fables book. It will be sort of like self-therapy.

My other e-course (Growing Older with Gusto!) is still available if you weren’t able to sign up for it before. Please pass the word to friends who might be interested!

A hui hou!

“Feral Fables” E-Course

NEW COURSE! “Feral Fables” to begin April 16, 2023.

For centuries, women and men have sought guidance and counsel to help them in processes of change, healing, and transformation. The most popular and the most universal of the wisdom traditions is telling stories, both as an art and as a way of learning about life.

The Feral Fables are unique stories of transformation that are not based on a particular ethnicity or cultural tradition, but rather draw from what is universal in each of the various traditions.

Most often in these stories, you will recognize someone or something that you have encountered before. You can receive the message of the story on an intuitive level. In this course, we will explore six of the fables in Feral Fables and their meaning for your life.

You will be permitted to drop your persona and rediscover who you really are. This e-course will assist in opening your heart and mind to new and often strange possibilities, ideas that come from that deep, wild, or feral self.

ON-GOING COURSE – “Growing Older with Gusto!”

This course is available for you to explore at your own pace. You may contact me for any questions you have as you go through the course.

A hui hou!

What’s Your Personality?

(Photo – courtesy of Hilton K. Jones)

Everyone has a personality. Some seem more dynamic than others, and sometimes we meet someone who doesn’t seem to have much personality at all.

So just exactly what is it that we call “personality?”

Sometimes we talk about someone who is famous or who is a celebrity of some sort as being a “Personality,” and we’re using the word as a title for that person.

Sometimes we say that someone has a lively or interesting personality, and just what does that mean? Does this “lively personality” only show up at certain times, or is that who this person is at all times? How can we know? And what makes it an “interesting” personality?

Generally, our personality is the combination of characteristics or qualities that make up who we are. And where do these qualities come from? Does our personality change throughout our lives? What are the influences in our lives that help to create what we call our “personality?” Can we decide how we want our personality to develop? Or is our personality something that just happens?

If you have ever wondered about your own personality or if you are curious about where it came from or how it developed, then you want to take my next online course that will start on April 30, 2023. Look for more information at Learn with Lucy.

A hui hou!

No Hardtack For Us


I haven’t always been in a place to garden. For about five years, I lived on my 37′ sailboat. At least one son lived there permanently with me, and two of my other teens spent a lot of time there, also. However, I kept several pots of aloe vera on hand for sunburns and cuts, as well as a hanging cherry tomato or two for something fresh to eat.

When I first moved onboard, I had a wicked time trying to cook a meal on the little two-burner propane stove. By the time I moved off the boat and into a house, I could cook a full Thanksgiving dinner on the tiny stove – turkey, pumpkin pie, and all the trimmings.

There was a small oven on the stove, and I had this fantasy that people would be lured by the smell of baking bread as we sailed along. Probably no one else could smell it, but it was enough to tantalize myself and whatever crew was sailing with me at the time. Can you smell it baking while I’m hoisting up my sails?

My recipe was simple – a no-knead whole wheat bread. In a very low oven, warm 7 ½ cups of whole wheat flour in a large bowl for about 20 minutes. Dissolve 6 teaspoons dry yeast in 1 cup lukewarm water and add 1 tablespoon honey. Mix 4 tablespoons molasses with 1 cup warm water. Combine yeast and molasses mixtures and add with 2 tablespoons salt to the warm flour. Add enough water to make a sticky dough, approximately 2 cups.

I usually get 2 large loaves out of this, or you can get 3 small loaves. Butter your pans and turn the dough into the pans. No need to knead the dough. Let it rise for an hour and preheat oven to 450 F. Bake about 50 minutes or until crust is brown. I let it stand in the oven for a bit after I turn off the oven. You are supposed to let it cool before you eat it, but I’ve never been able to do that!

I marked it in my cookbook that I fixed this for the first time while sailing into Avalon on July 25, 1980. Mark, my third child, was turning 21 the next day, so we celebrated that night.

Split pea soup became another tradition on all our homeward bound trips after a week or more at sea. It’s a good thing stoves on a sailboat are gimbaled so that they remain steady and the soup doesn’t slop out when we are heeled over on a good run.

Brown up some bacon ends and pieces in a pan, then add chopped onion and slivers of carrot and cook slightly. Add a package of split peas and water. Add seasonings. I put in pepper, oregano, marjoram, bay leaf, or whatever I have on hand. Simmer until peas and veggies are cooked, but I like to leave the peas slightly lumpy for a hearty soup. It thickens as it stands, but like the bread, it rarely has time to stand.

A big mug of hot pea soup with freshly baked bread slathered in butter seemed to make it easier to head back home. There was no hardtack for us!

Even though I am no longer known as the “BOATLDY,” I still fix this soup, and serve it along with biscuits, garlic bread, cornbread, or my fast no-knead whole wheat bread. It is a wonderfully rustic and earthy meal for visiting friends – and especially on those coolish evenings that we can experience, even here in Hawaii. A few fresh herbs from my herb garden add extra flavor.

More About “Growing Older with Gusto!”

“Growing Older with Gusto!” is now available for registration!

If you are interested, go to https://lavalily.com/learn-with-lucy/ to find out more about the course and to register. Checking out with PayPal will give you access to the course.

Because I am teaching this course through WordPress.com, you will also need to sign up for an account with WordPress.com. It’s simple and it’s free!

In the meantime, go to the link above, and read more about the course. I will be offering several other courses in the future. Share this information with anyone you think might be interested. If you have any questions, send me a note via lucyj@lavalily.com.

A hui hou

Lucy

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